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28 results for tradition found within the Blog

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Man-Made tradition vs Apostolic tradition

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 28th February 2016 in Early Church | early church,early church fathers,tradition,creeds,nicene creed,apostolic creed,man made tradition,apostolic tradition
Quite often in discussions which are about or involve some aspects of early church history or practices earlier Christians did, someone will inevitably throw out the "show stopper" that is "it's all just man made tradition" therefore not valid and the discussion is over. It’s as though saying it's "man made", without considering anything other than that they can't find an isolated chapter and verse in the bible which states something explicitly, means they've "won" the debate! Nothing more to see here folks, someone told us it's man made so we can all go home now. Either that, or the mere mention of the word “tradition” and suddenly you’re accused of be...
 

Does Easter Have Pagan Origins?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 22nd March 2021 in Easter | Easter,easter sunday,early church,church history,paganism,pagan roots,Ishtar,Eostre,fertility goddess
...apostolic tradition. But what this does show for certain is that Christians have been celebrating (and debating) Easter/Passover since at least AD 150, long before Constantine or even any other “pagan” influence could take hold. Is the Name “Easter” really the Anglo-Saxon goddess Eostre? In short: no. There’s also no link between “Ishtar” and “Easter” either. Ishar was an ancient Near Eastern fertility goddess, but just because the names sound somewhat similar in English, it doesn’t mean there is any etymological connection at all. Ishtar is also originally Akkadian, which was a language spoken in Mesopotamia (modern-day Iraq and Syria)...
 

What does the word "Catholic" mean?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 8th March 2021 in Etymology | catholic,church fathers,church history,etymology,roman catholic,eastern orthodox,Great Schism,Muratorian Fragment
...e ancient traditions passed on by the Apostles and evangelists (Gospels), and to those doctrines which were known as having apostolic origin. This view was more formally solidified by the words added to the end of the original Nicene Creed of A.D. 325 (“And whosoever shall say that there was a time when the Son of God was not … the Catholic and Apostolic Church anathematizes them.”) and also its revision in the Nicene-Constantinople Creed of A.D. 381 (“And we believe in one, holy, catholic and Apostolic Church.”), where you could call Nicene Christianity the “catholic faith”. Donatist Controversy During the fourth century, a controversy appeare...
 

Should Christians celebrate Halloween?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 30th October 2017 in Halloween | halloween,all saints day,all hallows eve,early church,tradition,cultural and society,celebrations,festivals,holidays,holy day
...Christian tradition in the Middle Ages, to others being older, Irish folktales. Trick or treating comes from an old Middle Ages tradition called “Souling”, where children or poor families would go around knocking on people’s houses offering prayers for their departed (who were assumed to be in Purgatory), in exchange for “Soul cakes” – which were essentially doughnuts. This was common all year round for the poor, but obviously more popular during holiday times, and was often accompanied by a song or poem as well as prayers. Carving vegetables goes back to older times, but it was usually a turnip that was made into a lantern, and not a pumpkin. Ther...
 

Who was the real Santa Claus?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 17th December 2018 in Christmas | christmas,xmas,St Nicholas,early church,Nicea council,father Christmas,santa claus
...where the tradition then came to England and merged with other ancient traditions of “Father Christmas”, a 15-17th century personification of Christmas in Britain. Sinterklaas played by Bram van der VlugtBy Gaby Kooiman, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link It’s also from the Dutch incarnation of St. Nicholas that we get the traditional red outfit and big white beard of Santa Claus. In the Dutch tradition, the Sinterklaas figure wears a red outfit styled after a liturgical vestment and traditional Bishops items, such as the mitre, alb and a crosier – a ceremonial shepherd's staff. He also carries a book listing out every child who has been good or naughty in the las...
 

Spiritual Disciplines of the Early Church: Ancient Practices for the 21st Century

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 17th June 2019 in Early Church |
...in later tradition. “But let not your fasts be with the hypocrites; … but fast on the fourth day (Wednesday) and the Preparation (Friday). … [But pray] as the Lord commanded in His Gospel (the Lord’s Prayer) … Thrice in the day thus pray.” Didache (c. 50 – 70) Alongside fasting, praying the Lord’s Prayer three times a day (morning, noon, evening) was a common discipline. From around the third century, liturgy and prayers in a church service would start to face East as that was seen where God’s glory arose, and in baptism ritual turning East was a sign of turning away from the devil towards Christ (Jews similarly prayed facing Jerusalem)...
 
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