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Man-Made tradition vs Apostolic tradition

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 28th February 2016 in Early Church | early church,early church fathers,tradition,creeds,nicene creed,apostolic creed,man made tradition,apostolic tradition
Quite often in discussions which are about or involve some aspects of early church history or practices earlier Christians did, someone will inevitably throw out the "show stopper" that is "it's all just man made tradition" therefore not valid and the discussion is over. It’s as though saying it's "man made", without considering anything other than that they can't find an isolated chapter and verse in the bible which states something explicitly, means they've "won" the debate! Nothing more to see here folks, someone told us it's man made so we can all go home now. Either that, or the mere mention of the word “tradition” and suddenly you’re accused of be...
 

Should Christians celebrate Halloween?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 30th October 2017 in Halloween | halloween,all saints day,all hallows eve,early church,tradition,cultural and society,celebrations,festivals,holidays,holy day
...Christian tradition in the Middle Ages, to others being older, Irish folktales. Trick or treating comes from an old Middle Ages tradition called “Souling”, where children or poor families would go around knocking on people’s houses offering prayers for their departed (who were assumed to be in Purgatory), in exchange for “Soul cakes” – which were essentially doughnuts. This was common all year round for the poor, but obviously more popular during holiday times, and was often accompanied by a song or poem as well as prayers. Carving vegetables goes back to older times, but it was usually a turnip that was made into a lantern, and not a pumpkin. Ther...
 

Who was the real Santa Claus?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 17th December 2018 in Christmas | christmas,xmas,St Nicholas,early church,Nicea council,father Christmas,santa claus
...where the tradition then came to England and merged with other ancient traditions of “Father Christmas”, a 15-17th century personification of Christmas in Britain. Sinterklaas played by Bram van der VlugtBy Gaby Kooiman, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link It’s also from the Dutch incarnation of St. Nicholas that we get the traditional red outfit and big white beard of Santa Claus. In the Dutch tradition, the Sinterklaas figure wears a red outfit styled after a liturgical vestment and traditional Bishops items, such as the mitre, alb and a crosier – a ceremonial shepherd's staff. He also carries a book listing out every child who has been good or naughty in the las...
 

Spiritual Disciplines of the Early Church: Ancient Practices for the 21st Century

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 17th June 2019 in Early Church |
...in later tradition. “But let not your fasts be with the hypocrites; … but fast on the fourth day (Wednesday) and the Preparation (Friday). … [But pray] as the Lord commanded in His Gospel (the Lord’s Prayer) … Thrice in the day thus pray.” Didache (c. 50 – 70) Alongside fasting, praying the Lord’s Prayer three times a day (morning, noon, evening) was a common discipline. From around the third century, liturgy and prayers in a church service would start to face East as that was seen where God’s glory arose, and in baptism ritual turning East was a sign of turning away from the devil towards Christ (Jews similarly prayed facing Jerusalem)...
 

Is fasting an expectation for Christians?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 29th February 2020 in Fasting | fasting,Lent,Ash Wednesday,self control,self denial
...The season of Lent is here once again which of course brings up the topic of fasting, since the tradition of Lent comes from following Jesus’ example of his time in the wilderness (Luke 4:1–2). I wasn’t planning on writing anything specific this year like I have previous in previous years, but I felt inspired today at church from one of Gospel readings: Matthew 9:14–15 Then the disciples of John came to him, saying, “Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but your disciples do not fast?” And Jesus said to them, “The wedding guests cannot mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them, can they? The days will come when the bridegroom is t...
 

The Coming of Jesus: Revelation Fulfilled?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 31st December 2015 in Second Coming Series | Revelation,Second Coming,Preterism,apocalypse,armageddon,fulfilled prophecy,Return of Christ,Return of Jesus,Eschatology
...istorical tradition and writings saying that Paul was martyred under Nero’s reign around 67 or 68 AD, which means if he followed “his predecessor” John, Revelation must have been written before 70 AD! There’s also one other reference which offers some insight (though is quite hard to find many sources on), in which the Syriac Vulgate Bible from the sixth century has an opening title to Revelation as follows: "The Apocalypse of St. John, written in Patmos, whither John was sent by Nero Caesar."   The late date theory is mainly due to a single quote by Irenaeus (plus a couple of other historical references about John which indirectly impact the early d...
 
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