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3 results for etymology found within the Blog

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Does Jesus mean Hail Zeus?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 13th June 2016 in etymology | apologetics,refuting nonsense,hail zeus,does Jesus mean Zeus,earth pig latin,etymology,linguistics
...ts a folk etymology of the name Pegasus as derived from πηγή pēgē "spring, well": "the pegai of Okeanos, where he was born."A proposed etymology of the name is Luwian pihassas, meaning "lightning", and Pihassassi, a local Luwian-Hittite name in southern Cilicia of a weather god represented with thunder and lightning. The proponents of this etymology adduce Pegasus' role, reported as early as Hesiod, as bringer of thunderbolts to Zeus. It was first suggested in 1952 and remains widely accepted, but Robin Lane Fox (2009) has criticized it as implausible."—Pegasus etymology You can read plenty more about Pegasus, his origins in the mythology and how he g...
 

John Chau, missionary to the Sentinelese: martyr or madness?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 3rd December 2018 in Missions | sentinelese,John Chau,missionary,martyrdom,martyr,india,current events,tribes people
...You've probably seen it in the news lately: John Chau, the American guy who tried to evangelise the secluded Sentinelese tribe off the coast of India. Much of the debate in secular media has centered around the grief of his friends and family; how he could have brought outside disease to the tribespeople and potentially killed them all (despite this not being their first contact with outsiders, with no known ill effect), or that he ventured there completely in ignorance with no preparation or wisdom — something which the missionary agency, All Nations, has recently debunked. But the question I want to look at is this: was Chau's mission total madness or is...
 

An Examination of Conditional Immortality (Part 1)

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 25th May 2020 in Hell | Conditional Immortality,Annihilationism,church fathers,church history,Hell,theology
...23). The etymology of “hell” and its origins and how it became the word we know today in English, would take more time than I have space for here, but in short, there are three main Greek words which often get translated as the word “hell”, even though they are each different words with different underlying meanings: GehennaLiterally means “valley of Hinnom”, which is a place near Jerusalem where children were once sacrificed to Baal (see Jer. 19:5–6). Due to its history, it took on a more eschatological/spiritual meaning as a place of judgement and destruction. Hades (Sheol)This is the Greek form of the Hebrew Sheol found in the Old Testament...
 
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