Blog Search Results Loading...

Listening...

[stop listening]

Search elsewhere: WebpagesBlogMembers

Show Search Hints »


27 results for episle of Polycarp to the Philippians found within the Blog

6 displayed out of 27 (4.00seconds)

Page 1 of 5

Lent: Day 4 - Polycarp to the Philippians

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 4th March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,episle of Polycarp to the Philippians
Day Four: Epistle of Polycarp to the Philippians (full text) Who: Polycarp of Smyrna, who was a direct disciple of the apostle John. We also have some information about Polycarp via Irenaeus (who knew Polycarp) in his book, Adv. Haer., III.3.4: “But Polycarp also was not only instructed by apostles, and conversed with many who had seen Christ, but was also, by apostles in Asia, appointed bishop of the Church in Smyrna”. What: Lots of exhortations are contained in this letter, and is also referenced by Irenaeus as being for “those who wish to do so, and are anxious about their salvation, can learn the character of his (Polycarp's) faith, and the preachin...
 

Man-Made Tradition vs Apostolic Tradition

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 28th February 2016 in Early Church | early church,early church fathers,tradition,creeds,nicene creed,apostolic creed,man made tradition,apostolic tradition
Quite often in discussions which are about or involve some aspects of early church history or practices earlier Christians did, someone will inevitably throw out the "show stopper" that is "it's all just man made tradition" therefore not valid and the discussion is over. It’s as though saying it's "man made", without considering anything other than that they can't find an isolated chapter and verse in the bible which states something explicitly, means they've "won" the debate! Nothing more to see here folks, someone told us it's man made so we can all go home now. Either that, or the mere mention of the word “tradition” and suddenly you’re accused of be...
 

Lent: Day 11 - Ignatius to Polycarp

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 13th March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Ignatius,Ignatius to Polycarp,martyrdom
Day Eleven: St. Ignatius of Antioch: Letter to Polycarp (full text) Who: Ignatius converted at a young age and later became Bishop of Antioch. A friend of Polycarp and fellow disciple of John, there is a long standing tradition that Ignatius was the child that Jesus held in his arms and blessed in Mark 10:13-16 What: A letter addressed personally to Polycarp giving him advice and encouragement as a bishop, plus some instructions on marriage to the church, which are reminiscent of Paul’s epistles. Why: Ignatius wrote a series of letters to the churches in Asia Minor whilst en route to Rome to face martyrdom by wild beasts in the Colosseum around 108 AD. Wh...
 

Does Easter Have Pagan Origins?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 22nd March 2021 in Easter | Easter,easter sunday,early church,church history,paganism,pagan roots,Ishtar,Eostre,fertility goddess
Much like any major Christian holiday, there are the usual arguments and accusations about how it’s all just pagan festivities with a “Christian mask”. Easter is no different, and usually gets hit the hardest over its so-called “pagan roots”, or in the month or so preceding it, Lent being some “invention of the Catholic Church”. Table of Contents the Lenten Fast the Easter controversy and why we celebrate it when we do Is the Name “Easter” really the Anglo-Saxon goddess Eostre? Chocolate eggs and bunnies? Concluding Thoughts Further Reading and Sources I like to try and observe Lent, as it is one of the most ancient cu...
 

Lent: Intro - 40 Day Reading Plan with the Fathers

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 1st March 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading
This year for Lent I'm following a reading plan which comprises of a collection of extracts from various early church fathers writings. Each day I'm going to write a short overview and any thoughts on the text and link back to the source material so you can also follow along with me too, if you'd like. the overview of each day will probably be posted on the day after. the reading should only take 10-15 minutes of your time, and by day 40, you will have read ten different Fathers: Didache, Diognetus, Polycarp, Ignatius, Justin Martyr, Cyprian, Athanasius, Cyril of Jerusalem, Ambrose of Milan, and Leo the Great. I'll be reading from the “Church Fathers Lenten...
 

What is Contemplative Prayer?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 9th February 2016 in Prayer | contemplation,prayer,meditate,meditation,waiting on the Lord,silence,Christian meditation,Lectio Divina
In the quiet, still silence, I await my God.   there seems to be some misgivings about the idea of “contemplative prayer” (also referred to as Christian Meditation) and in some of the descriptions I've read, I would agree that it can seem iffy. Contemplation, or sometimes known as Lectio Divina, is in its most basic form, the idea and practice of waiting on the Lord. often in silence or while you ponder on scripture or when you seek an answer or just to rest in his presence and have your strength renewed. there are some people who think that this means “emptying your mind” and doing something akin to occultism, and ope...
 
[1] 2 3 4 ...of 5 | Next | Last Page