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5 results for christology found within the Blog

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The Relationship Between Jesus and Sophia

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 22nd July 2021 in christology | wisdom,Sophia,feminism,women,christology,early church,early church fathers
Now you may be wondering about the title, or thinking “who the heck is Sophia??” — well, bear with me, and all will be revealed. It’s not as sinister or weird as it may first appear. I saw a post on my Instagram feed the other day that just got me a little riled up. I’ll admit it, I can be a little short-tempered at times, especially around the subject of Jesus and seeing him/the Christian faith misrepresented to such a degree that it could mislead others down the wrong path. I don’t normally write responses to things like this, but I felt this one deserved it, mainly just to add some clarity to a somewhat confusing topic, and so there’s a pla...
 

Lent Day 37: Leo the Great: Letter XXVIII (called the "Tome")

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 12th April 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Doctor of the Church,lectures,Tome,Leo the Great,St Leo,hypostatic union,deity of christ,heresy,Pope Leo I
Day Thirty-seven: St. Leo the Great: Letter XXVIII (called the "Tome") Who: Leo the Great, also known as Pope St. Leo I (the Great), was Pope from 440-61 AD. Place and date of birth unknown; died 10 November, 461. Leo's pontificate, next to that of St. Gregory I, is the most significant and important in Christian antiquity, as he tried to  combat the heresies which seriously threatened church unity even in the West, such as Pelagianism. What: A defence of the twofold nativity and nature of Christ against the false teaching of a priest called Eutyches. It is a doctrinal letter sent by Pope Leo I in the year 449 to Flavian, Patriarch of Constantinople, on the...
 

What does the word "Catholic" mean?

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 8th March 2021 in Etymology | catholic,church fathers,church history,etymology,roman catholic,eastern orthodox,Great Schism,Muratorian Fragment
  For many people today, non-Christians and (low church) Christians alike, when they hear the word “Catholic”, certain images spring to mind: the Pope, the rosery, Catholic school, big old churches buildings, choirboys, maybe monks or statues of Mary even; and sadly more recently, sex abuse scandals. But, generally speaking, all of these are actually aspects of Roman Catholicism — a particular branch of Christianity, and not what the word “catholic” truly means as we’ll see when examining how the early church used the word and what the original Greek word means. καθολικός (katholikos) The Greek word where we get the English word “c...
 

Lent Day 38: Leo the Great: Sermon XXI (On the Nativity Feast I)

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 13th April 2017 in Lent | Lent,great lent,fasting,early church fathers,devotional,daily reading,Doctor of the Church,lectures,Leo the Great,St Leo,hypostatic union,deity of christ,Pope Leo I,christology,sermon
Day Thirty-eight: St. Leo the Great: Sermon XXI (On the Nativity Feast I) Who: Leo the Great, also known as Pope St. Leo I (the Great), was Pope from 440-61 AD. Place and date of birth unknown; died 10 November, 461. Leo's pontificate, next to that of St. Gregory I, is the most significant and important in Christian antiquity, as he tried to  combat the heresies which seriously threatened church unity even in the West, such as Pelagianism. What: A sermon on the Nativity at Christmas time, about the incarnation of the Word of God. Why: To explain the incarnation and preach the Good News of our Lord and Saviour becoming man for our sake so that we may be sav...
 

Creedal Christians: The Nicene Creed

Posted by Luke J. Wilson on 2nd June 2019 in Early Church | nicene creed,nicea council,creeds,creedal christians,creedal
The Nicene Creed — what is it and why is it called that? This creed gets its name from a time and place: the first ecumenical Church council held at Nicaea, which is now known as İznik in northwestern Turkey, in 325 AD. Now that may raise another question for you: what is an ecumenical council? Well, to explain more about the Nicene Creed, we are going to have to take a look at The First Council of Nicaea in order to better understand why this creed was written. First things first though; an “ecumenical council” is ideally a Church-wide meeting where all the Bishops from all across the Church come together to hold a very large and very important meetin...
 
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